May 05, 2021 3 min read

The 4th of July is almost here, a time of celebration, BBQ’s, and fireworks as we celebrate the nation’s birthday. But for many dogs, the holiday is a time of stress and anxiety as the loud noises and explosions cause fear. Check out our tips for keeping your pet calm during the festivities.

While it’s not impossible for dogs and fireworks to coexist peacefully, many dogs experience fear during the celebrations. Studies show that as many as 62% of dogs experience some kind of distress during fireworks as the loud noises trigger their nervous systems and cause a survival instinct to kick in.

Preparing your dog for the 4th of July

To adequately prepare for the evening fireworks, getting your dog ready starts in advance. One strategy to help keep them calm is to help condition them to the sound of fireworks in the weeks and days leading up to the holiday. Playing fireworks around the house, loud enough to be heard but not loud enough to cause distress, is a good way of allowing them to ease into it.

Some trainers take it a step further as well with counterconditioning by adding a treat to the practice. Over time, the dog is no longer afraid of the noise, and instead associates the negative of the fireworks with the positive of the treats and sees both as a positive.

When the day does finally prepare, it’s important to help prepare your dog as the day goes on. With the celebrations always happening at night, taking advantage of the daylight can help ease tensions at night.

The best way to prepare is to exercise throughout the day, whether it be long walks, a rousing game of tug-o-war, or a playdate with a friend, can all tire your dog out. When night does roll around, they’ll be sleepy and calm, with little desire to go outside as well.

Finally, in preparation, make sure your dog feels safe, including not being left alone. While we would love to take dogs with us to the lake or parties, adding an uncomfortable surrounding just takes them further out of their comfort zone and add to the panic. If your dog is one to get anxious around fireworks, they will want to be where they feel the safest, which is likely at home in a crate, under the bed, or wherever they prefer.

If you are leaving the house, it would be wise to also consider somebody staying behind or asking a close friend the dog is familiar with to pet sit for a couple of hours. Anything to make them feel like they’re not in danger, including a friendly face that they trust and love.

How to keep your dog calm during 4th of July celebrations

Even if you’re prepared adequately and did everything right, a dog’s instincts might still get the best of them as they fear the loud noises suddenly happening around them.

One of the best ways to keep a dog distracted has been and always will be treats and toys. Anything that can get their focus away from what’s happening around them is best, so time-consuming toys like Kongs, bones, or bully sticks are great to keep on hand.

If they do start to act up and nothing is working to keep them distracted, the best bet from there is to know how to keep them calm. Using a low, soothing voice to ease their minds works well, as opposed to high-pitched tones which tends to make them believe something is wrong. Similarly, long, slow pets help as well.

And as mentioned above, letting them find their safe space can help them feel comfortable. No matter where that is, letting your dog go naturally where they feel safest lets them feel as if they have some control of the situation, rather than sitting helplessly.

Although it’s a time of joy for many of us, the 4th of July can be a hard day and night for dogs. Helping them through it can be a difficult, yet important, task for pet owners, but there’s no reason to not be able to still enjoy the holiday.

--

Taking your dog with you on a trip for Independence Day? Read our guide on What You Need to Do When Taking Your Dog on Vacation. If you’re looking for treats to chew on during fireworks, shop our main site to find one they’ll love!


Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in BBS Blog

smiling woman with senior dog
Everything You Need to Know About Senior Dog Care

May 12, 2022 7 min read

Getting old is hard on all of us, and it’s no different for your aging dog. You may have noticed your dog, who once seemed to have endless amounts of energy, is now slowing down and dealing with the effects of old age. In this ultimate guide, we’re going to break down senior dog care into five essential categories: diet and nutrition, mobility, grooming and hygiene, physical health conditions, and behavior and lifestyle.
girl coming home to a welcoming dog
A Helpful Guide: How to Train a Dog Not to Jump

April 27, 2022 3 min read

Jumping is a natural, though undesirable, behavior in dogs. Dogs jumping on people can stain or rip their clothes, knock them over, and potentially cause other types of injuries — which means that it’s really important to train a dog not to jump on people as a way of saying hello. In this quick guide, we’ll explain why dogs jump and then explain how to train your dog not to jump.
dog panting over chewed pillow
How to Deal with Puppy Separation Anxiety

March 30, 2022 3 min read

Separation anxiety is distressing for both you and your dog, and more puppies than ever are experiencing separation anxiety. In this guide, we’ll offer some pointers to help you determine if your dog is experiencing separation anxiety or just being a puppy.